Header Background Image

    Gravitynovels

    A World Beyond / So We Are Told
    We have Changed the website, so if you face any bugs and error , do tell in discord.

    United Nations Human Resource Development Organization, Asia Branch

     

     

    The United Nations Human Resource Development Organization trains and develops talent that can assist institutions and private organizations in their maintenance and operations, with the goal of supplying competent human resources.

     

    It succeeded the International Human Resource Development Organization established in 1946 and is also called UNHRDO (United Nations Human Resource Development Organization).

     

    The United Nations Human Resource Development Organization aims to provide multifaceted talent dispatch, relocation, and distribution on a non-profit basis. Its headquarters and main body are located in New York City, USA, with auxiliary branches in Berlin, Germany, for Europe; Hong Kong, China, for Asia; Canberra, Australia, for Australia; Johannesburg, South Africa, for Africa; and Sao Paulo, Brazil, for South America.

     

    (omitted)

     

    When I arrived at Chek Lap Kok Airport, a car was already waiting to pick me up.

     

    A large man who didn’t look like a driver silently greeted my uncle and loaded the luggage while I put my single small Boston bag next to my uncle’s luggage and got into the car, sitting next to my uncle.

     

    My uncle handed me a thin booklet with brief descriptions and photos of where we were going. As expected, it didn’t contain any information suitable for external publicity, but I skimmed through it carefully in a few minutes. It was a thin, nutrition-less booklet with fanciful words that didn’t say much. Besides, I had already done a quick online search before leaving.

     

    As I fanned myself lightly with the booklet I had quickly finished reading, the car left the airport.

     

    My uncle quietly took the booklet from my hand and flipped through a few pages, smiling. He must have thought it was a waste of pulp without substance as well.

     

    “It’s easier to understand if you think of it as an organization that trains bureaucrats and influential figures for agencies in various countries.”

     

    “Even if you glorify it like that, it’s still just a business of raising people and selling them to various groups, right?”

     

    “Well, since people who want to be’sold’ gather and apply voluntarily, it’s mutual benefit in a way.”

     

    My words were not meant to criticize, but my uncle didn’t seem particularly offended by them being taken as criticism.

     

    I casually flipped through the booklet my uncle handed back to me. Ignoring the fanciful words that grasped at clouds, I turned my eyes to the photos used as their background. There were splendid buildings, conference rooms equipped with cutting-edge technology, and rows of trustworthy-looking men with stern expressions.

     

    “See anyone there to your taste?”

     

    My uncle leaned over with a grin to look at the booklet with me. I made a sour face and shook my head to the side.

     

    “I don’t have a taste for men who reek of ambition… I don’t feel like embracing someone who gives off such a strong masculine scent. I prefer someone soft and lovable who smells like soap or milk, but it doesn’t seem like I’d find that type in this industry.”

     

    “Soap or milk… Underage sex is a crime in China too. Well, it’s effectively extraterritorial once you get past the compound fences, but there are no minors inside. Go ahead and touch all you like.”

     

    “Uncle… turning me into a shameless child molester in an instant… I’ve never seen boys in their single digits or teens that way.”

     

    My uncle chuckled softly. I stared at him and casually remarked,

     

    “If you were twenty years younger, you might have been my type; who knows?”

     

    At that, the smile disappeared from my uncle’s face for a moment. He blinked at me strangely for a bit before breaking into laughter. With a shrug that said ‘alright’, he changed the subject.

     

    “Since you’ll find out anyway once you get there, is there anything you’re curious about?”

     

    “Well, I’d have to know at least a little to get curious, but I know absolutely nothing, so I don’t even know what I don’t know. As you said, I’ll learn bit by bit once I’m there.”

     

    I put the booklet down on my lap and turned my gaze out the window. The road from the airport into any city looks similar. a decently open highway without much scenery.

     

    “My brother worked at the Americas headquarters briefly before, right?”

     

    “Jae-ui? Yes. He was thoroughly a brain type. They still covet him at headquarters.”

     

    I glanced at my uncle.

     

    “Brain type? So headquarters and branches are divided like that?”

     

    “Not necessarily, but generally yes. Headquarters is the brain house. You can get in if you have an outstanding mind, even with physical disabilities. The branches need basic physical fitness to support you. That doesn’t mean you can get in just by being good at fighting if your brain is all muscle, so to put it simply, the branches aim to train MacGyvers.”

     

    “MacGyvers, I’m not confident in that.”

     

    “What, what. You’ll get the hang of it after rolling around for a few months.”

     

    I looked at my cheerfully speaking uncle with weary eyes and slowly began voicing the questions that were gradually coming to mind, one by one.

     

    “So the three branches don’t differ much?”

     

    “Right. The training process is the same. So there’s an occasional exchange of a few people between branches each quarter, depending on the circ*mstances. But each branch does have slightly different atmospheres. The South America guys are a bit weird in the head, the Africa guys are unpredictable, the Australia guys are a bit unlucky, and the Europe guys are fucking unlucky.”

     

    There was quite a gap between his cheerful tone and the content.

     

    “Bad blood with the European side?”

     

    “Headquarters and branches don’t get along, and neither do the branches with each other. That’s how groups in competition are. Among them, the Asia and Europe branches especially hate each other. There’s joint training for two weeks once a year, and blood flies. Fun to watch.”

     

    “…”

     

    Somehow, rather than considering the Europe branch unlucky, my uncle seemed to enjoy the atmosphere of making them unlucky in order to create flying blood whenever there was an incident.

     

    Well, my uncle did have a somewhat benevolent impression of his looks, but there was a considerable difference between his mind and appearance. Even I, who knew him well, would sometimes be stunned.

     

    I sank into the seat. The moderately plush seat felt nice.

     

    I hadn’t been able to rest properly for days, hurried along by my uncle, who had burst in like a storm. If I closed my eyes now, I could probably fall asleep.

     

    Noticing my state, my uncle quietly said:

     

    “I know it’ll be tough getting used to things for a while, and I’d tell you to grab some shut-eye now if I could, but we’ll arrive at the docks soon. It’ll be harder if you fall into deep sleep and have to wake up.”

     

    “Docks?”

     

    I turned my head. At some point, the car had entered the city, and the streets were gradually filling with buildings. Jumbled, chaotic signboards loomed overhead, and dilapidated buildings as worn-down as my apartment complex lined up densely. Just looking up a little from the flashy, glittering shopping districts, laundry hung outside shabby buildings with peeling paint.

     

    “Is the branch on Hong Kong Island?”

     

    “No.”

     

    “Then why are we going to the docks?”

     

    “We have to get on a boat.”

     

    “Is it in Macau?”

     

    My uncle burst into laughter. I stared blankly at him. As we left the peninsula on a boat, saying it wasn’t Hong Kong Island, the only thing that came to mind was there.

     

    My uncle shook his head.

     

    “An outlying island further than Hong Kong Island It’s administratively part of Hong Kong, China, but effectively extraterritorial. That’s where the UNHRDO Asia branch is located.”

     

    “I see. It’s like an old prison island where they locked up convicts so they couldn’t escape.”

     

    “Well, I can’t say that wasn’t part of the intention at all.”

     

    My uncle said it with a smile, then turned his gaze to me.

     

    “Members alternate going on leave every other week; they’re free from Friday 5 p.m. to Sunday 5 p.m., so you can go out and play then if you want. Ships run between the island and Hong Kong and the Kowloon Peninsula for the members.”

     

    “Listening to you, Uncle…”

     

    “Hmm?”

     

    “Rather than the UNHRDO Asia branch being on that island, it seems the UNHRDO Asia branch is ‘only’ on that island.”

     

    “Correct.”

     

    “…”

     

    I shook my head bitterly with a sour smile.

     

    After passing the straight, vibrant downtown and circling around the grandly soaring hotels, the docks came into view up ahead.

     

    I’d been gazing indifferently at Hong Kong Island, visible across the sea, when I suddenly turned my head.

     

    “Come to think of it, I have another question.”

     

    “Yeah?”

     

    “What should I call you there?”

     

    My uncle smiled. And with a face mixing familial and professional expressions, he said:

     

    “Instructor Jeong Chang-in Or just Instructor for short.”

     

    * * *

     

    It seemed to take just over an hour from leaving the peninsula to reaching the island.

     

    I’d imagined a tiny deserted island since it was said to be an isolated island with just the branch, but it was surprisingly big, so we had to go further in by car along a road lined by the beach after arriving at the island’s port.

     

    Perhaps because it was around sunset, the forest densely covering the inland looked peculiarly dark and lush.

     

    “It wouldn’t be strange for dangerous beasts or venomous snakes to come out in a place like this.”

     

    As I muttered, my uncle casually nodded.

     

    “Venomous snakes do come out. So you have to watch your step at night. Don’t worry too much, though. There is nothing with enough venom to immediately kill a human, so you won’t die if you get first aid right away.”

     

    I gave my uncle an incredulous look, so he added that there was no need to worry, as if to reassure me.

     

    It definitely seemed like I’d made the wrong choice coming here. He said six months, but really, isn’t half a year far too much time for a person to die an unlucky death?

     

    I was thinking of somehow enduring until next weekend and escaping to Hong Kong, but my uncle picked then to mention, as if just recalling:

     

    “Oh right. We can’t go out for about a month. The joint training with the Europe branch starts in two weeks. It lasts half a month. No outside leave before then for the special training period or during the joint training either. A month will pass quickly, so hang in there and get used to things well during that time.”

     

    I was more curious about just how much this uncle knew rather than feeling the sincere desire to strangle him for a moment.

     

    I glared longingly at my uncle’s neck as he laughed, then suddenly felt gazes and briefly glanced ahead. My eyes met the driver’s in the rearview mirror. The corners of the driver’s eyes creased slightly when our eyes met—the hint of a smile.

     

    It was the driver who had picked us up at the airport. He had driven from the airport to the docks, crossed the waters with us, and was still driving now that we had entered the island. Don’t tell me he sailed the ship too.

     

    He had a similar scent. The scent of a soldier who had lived roughly—though my uncle repeatedly said he wasn’t a soldier nor with the military. Everyone I run into once I arrive on that island will probably have that kind of scent.

     

    With that thought, I heaved a sigh and turned my head. My vigor to strangle my uncle had disappeared.

     

    “A joint training with the ‘unlucky’ Europe branch where ‘blood flies’… I entered right in time to suffer. Looking back, you actually dislike me after all, don’t you, Uncle?”

     

    “No way.”

     

    My uncle laughed. I was rather put off, as I seemed to have entered an orthodox bad position.

     

    Joint training, huh? I was used to that kind of training. I’d rolled around doing that kind of training daily these past few years. I was an army officer until five months ago, after all. I wonder what kind of training they do here.

     

    No matter how tough it is, I’ll get used to it if I don’t die. Each time is newly painful as I go through it, but the day comes when that repeated time becomes familiar… Then, at some point, I might have an accident from being unable to restrain my irritated personality, but that’s a matter of personal choice.

     

    I suddenly felt irritated and scratched my head roughly.

     

    I’d never regretted what I did up until now. No matter what I did, I engraved deeply in my mind to never do anything I would regret.

     

    So I don’t regret beating that unlucky buddy to barely kill him. Considering I had endured hardship for five and a half years before it came to that, I think that was enough patience. As a result—well, it was really the complex result of various matters—being discharged from the military, which I once thought would stake me for life, was not something to regret either.

     

    However, remembering the situation and feelings back then still twisted my insides.

     

    0 Comments

    Enter your details or log in with:
    Heads up! Your comment will be invisible to other guests and subscribers (except for replies), including you after a grace period. But if you submit an email address and toggle the bell icon, you will be sent replies until you cancel.